CPAWS Blog

News and views on conservation in Canada, and updates from CPAWS chapters across the country.

What’s New Caribou


An update on Alberta’s woodland caribou populations and a short interview with CPAWS’ own Tara Russell If you’ve been following the CPAWS Northern Alberta (NAB) blog or social media lately (Twitter, Facebook, Instagram), you know that we are all about caribou. We are all for the preservation of the face of Canada’s quarter, a key player in Canada’s boreal forest ecosystems. Unfortunately, caribou are especially sensitive to ecological disturbances and Alberta’s own caribou herds are facing huge risks. If industrial development continues as it has been, local caribou herds will not sustain themselves.

Edmonton Students Join CPAWS Northern Alberta in Delivering Caribou Petitions to Ministers


On Monday, December 5th, 40 grade 2 and 3 students joined CPAWS Northern Alberta staff (and Bou!) in presenting a caribou petition to the Minister of Environment and Parks, Shannon Phillips, and the Minister of Education, David Eggen. The petition contained thousands of signatures from concerned citizens across Alberta calling for the government to protect the province’s boreal woodland caribou.

The Big Hike Part One


Adrian Pearce shares a story of hiking with his friend Roy through the foothills of Alberta's Rockies. As is usual with Adrian, hilarity ensues!

Back 2 Backpacking by Adrian Pearce Part 4


CPAWS member Adrian Pearce continues his adventure of learning how to backpack after a forty year absence. Hiking the West Coast Trail is planned for this summer and in this blog Adrian describes his preparations...

How Much Do We Caribou Them, Part Two by Marcus Becker


In “How much do we Caribou them, Part 1,” we examined the urgency of the situation facing caribou populations in Alberta and the significant desire among Albertans to see this iconic species preserved into the future. Despite this desire, successful solutions to this conservation problem do not seem to be emerging from either our provincial or federal governments. Why is the case? Well, although we zeroed in on the benefits of caribou conservation in the last post, there is more to the story: costs.

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